animals that start with q

Animals That Start With Q: List With Pictures & Facts

Animals that start with q: list with pictures and facts. Discover animals beginning with q, including some amazing Australian marsupials, an air-breathing fish & the world’s largest butterfly! We’ve also included some extinct species …

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Animals That Start With Q: Pictures & Facts

On this page you’ll find a list of amazing animals beginning with q, together with pictures and interesting facts about each animal. Below many of the animals are links that you can follow for further information, pictures and videos.

Included in this list are individual species (e.g. quokka) and well-known groups of species (e.g. quolls) whose names begin with Q. The scientific name and conservation status are provided for each of the individual species.

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List of Animals Beginning With Q

Quagga

quagga

  • Scientific Name: Equus quagga quagga
  • Conservation Status: Extinct

The quagga is an extinct subspecies of plains zebra. (A species is split into subspecies when it has two or more separate populations, and there are differences between members of each population.)

The quagga only had stripes on the front half of its body. Its rear was brown and its legs and undersides were pale. It was found in South Africa.

The quagga was confirmed as being extinct in 1900. The species’ extinction was caused by overhunting.


Quail

Californian quail

Californian quail

Quail are small and mid-sized gamebirds. There are two types of quail: Old World quail, native to the continents of Europe, Asia and Africa; and New World quail, native to the continents of North and South America.

Old and New World quail are only distantly related to one another.

Quail spend most of their lives on the ground, and tend only to fly for short distances. Some species of quail have been domesticated, and are bred for food. Quail eggs are considered a delicacy in many countries.


Quechuan Hocicudo

(No image available)

  • Scientific Name: Oxymycterus hucucha
  • Conservation Status: Endangered

The Quechuan Hocicudo is a rat-like rodent that lives in the Andean cloud forests of Bolivia. Little is known about this species. It is mainly insectivorous (insect-eating), and probably uses its long claws for excavating invertebrates from the earth.

The species is endangered due to deforestation.


Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing Butterfly

Queen Alexandra's Birdwing Butterfly

  • Scientific Name: Ornithoptera alexandrae
  • Conservation Status: Endangered

The Queen Alexandra’s birdwing butterfly is the world’s largest butterfly. The wingspan of the female can reach 25 cm (9.84 in.) and individuals can weigh up to 12 grams (0.42 oz.). Females are brown and white, while the males, which are smaller, are iridescent green and black.

The Queen Alexandra’s birdwing is found in a small region of Papua New Guinea. The species’ endangered status is due to habitat loss. The rainforest in which it lives is being destroyed to make way for palm oil plantations. The eruption of Mount Lamington (a nearby volcano) also destroyed much of the insect’s natural habitat.


Queen of Sheba’s Gazelle

(No image available)

  • Scientific Name: Gazella bilkis
  • Conservation Status: Extinct

The Queen of Sheba’s Gazelle is an extinct species of antelope. It was found on hillsides and mountains of Yemen. It was a common species in the mid twentieth century. The cause of its extinction is unclear, but it is known to have been hunted by the army for food.

Little is known about the Queen of Sheba’s Gazelle. It may not even have been a distinct species; some studies have shown it to be a subspecies of mountain gazelle.


Queen Snake

Regina septemvittataPCCA20060513-3674B

  • Scientific Name: Regina septemvittata
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern

The queen snake is a nonvenomous snake found in North America. The species is semiaquatic and lives near rivers and streams. It is a member of the family Colubridae (the largest snake family).

The queen snake’s back is dark green in color. Its belly and sides are cream with dark stripes. The snake is around 15 to 42 in (38 to 61 cm) in length.


Queensland Grouper

Queensland Grouper

  • Scientific Name: Epinephelus lanceolatus
  • Conservation Status: Vulnerable

The Queensland grouper, otherwise known as the giant grouper, is a fish found in the tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

It is the largest bony fish found on coral reefs. (Bony fish are fish whose skeletons are made of real bone, unlike fish such as sharks, whose skeletons are made of a softer material called cartilage.)

Queensland Lungfish

Queensland Lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri)

  • Scientific Name: Neoceratodus forsteri
  • Conservation Status: Unassessed

The Queensland lungfish is one of only six lungfish species. Lungfish are fish that are able to breathe air, rather than obtaining oxygen from the water via gills.

Unlike other lungfish, the Queensland lungfish is also able to use its gills, and has one lung, rather than two.

The Queensland lungfish is found in still or slow-flowing rivers in northern Queensland, Australia.


Queensland Ringtail Possum

Possum Ring-tailed444

  • Scientific Name: Pseudocheirus peregrinus
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern

The Queensland ringtail is more commonly known as the common ringtail possum. It is a marsupial (pouched mammal) found only in Australia.

The common ringtail possum is around the size of a cat, and has grey fur with white undersides. Its tail is prehensile (able to grip) and is used when climbing.

The species has adapted to the presence of humans, and is often seen in gardens.


Queensland Tube-Nosed Fruit Bat

Nyctimene robinsoni

  • Scientific Name: Nyctimene robinsoni
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern

The Queensland tube-nosed fruit bat is also known as the eastern tube-nosed bat. It is found in north-east Australia and possibly on neighboring islands, including New Guinea.

The species is brown and has pale spots on its wings. It has protruding, tube-shaped nostrils, from which the species gets its name.


Quelea (Red Billed)

Red-billed Quelea (Quelea quelea) (6040990915)

  • Scientific Name: Quelea quelea
  • Conservation Status: Least Concern

The red-billed quelea is a small bird found in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa (i.e. the area south of the Sahara Desert). It has pale brown wings, cream chest and a sturdy red bill. Males have black faces and orange heads.

The red-billed quelea is the world’s most common non-domestic bird species. It is thought that the species’ population numbers around 1.5 billion individuals. The bird forms huge flocks, which roam the land in search of food.

The red-billed quelea feeds on seeds, and can cause considerable damage to crops. For this reason the species is often controlled using poisons and other methods.


Quetzal

resplendent quetzal

Resplendent quetzal

Quetzals are colorful birds found mainly in tropical regions of Central and South America. The best-known quetzal is the resplendent quetzal, the males of which have extremely long green tails. As with many bird species, female quetzals are usually less-brightly colored than the males.


Quokka

Quokka

  • Scientific Name: Setonix brachyurus
  • Conservation Status: Vulnerable

What list of animals that start with q would be complete without the quokka? The quokka is a cat-sized member of the kangaroo family, Macropodidae. It is found in the south west of West Australia, both on the mainland and on several nearby islands. The largest population of quokkas is found on Rottnest Island.

The species was once more widespread and common within its range. The species suffered due to the introduction of non-native predators such as foxes and cats, and is now rated Vulnerable.

  • Find out more about this cute marsupial here: Quokka Facts

Quoll

Quoll

Eastern quoll

Quolls are small to medium sized marsupials that are found in Australia and New Guinea. Four species of quoll are found in Australia, the other two being found in New Guinea.

Quolls are solitary, nocturnal animals. They are carnivorous (meat-eating), and feed on small animals such as insects, birds and reptiles.

All six species of quoll are either Near Threatened or Endangered.


Animals That Start With Q: Conclusion

We hope that you’ve enjoyed finding out about the animals beginning with q on this page. You can continue your exploration of the animal kingdom by checking out the following pages:

Discover animals beginning with …

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